Eu China Geographical Indications Agreement

19 Sep 2021

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Eu China Geographical Indications Agreement

Geographical indications have also proven to be a useful marketing tool that helps to ensure higher and more stable export earnings for producers: according to a study commissioned by the Commission in 2013, a geographical indication product is sold on average more than twice as much as a similar non-geographical product. In addition, China is a potential high-growth market for European food and beverages. This agreement will therefore benefit European producers and should give a boost to the rural areas where these products are manufactured. Within four years of its entry into force, the scope of the agreement will be extended to another 175 GIs from both parties. These names must follow the same authorisation procedure as the 100 names already covered by the agreement (evaluation and publication of comments). The agreement is expected to enter into force in 2021. Four years later, about 175 other GIs from both sides will be included in the agreement. “I am proud that this agreement is approaching its entry into force and reflects our commitment to cooperate closely with our global trading partners such as China,” said Janusz Wojciechowski, European Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development. The protection of geographical indications of origin aims to prevent counterfeiting or fraudulent counterfeiting of a large number of foods and beverages closely identified with certain geographical regions, such as EU champagne and feta cheese (Champagne in France and Greece) or Panjin Da Mi (panjin rice) and Yantal Ping Guo (Yantal apple) from China. On September 14, 2020, China and the European Union signed a bilateral agreement on geographical indications (GIs).

The agreement protects 100 g of European indicators in China and 100 g of Chinese ratios in the European Union. The agreement is expected to enter into force in early 2021. Within four years of its entry into force, the scope of the Agreement shall be extended to an additional 175 GIs of each Party. After the signature of the agreement and the consent of the European Parliament, it is officially adopted by the Council. The agreement is expected to enter into force in early 2021. The European Commission has just announced that the EU and China have signed a bilateral agreement to protect geographical indications (GIs) against usurpation and counterfeiting. The agreement, first concluded in November 2019 and approved by the Council in July 2020, will protect 100 g of European indicators in China and 100 g of Chinese personal enterprises in the EU. . .

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